Bunbury indigenous students on path to success

South Metro Youth Link representative Courtney Ugle with students Glenn Bennell, Maddy Anderson,  Joahanna Hill, Tahlia Bennell and representative Melissa Garlette.
South Metro Youth Link representative Courtney Ugle with students Glenn Bennell, Maddy Anderson, Joahanna Hill, Tahlia Bennell and representative Melissa Garlette.

INDIGENOUS students at Newton Moore Senior High School are gaining industry experience before leaving school thanks to a non-ATAR pathway.  

The school has about 14 students who take part in the Aboriginal School Based Training VET program which is a government funded model.

Alf Mungioli is the career and vocational education coordinator who said the program was about identifying each student’s individual needs and finding suitable work experience for them.

“The training develops employability skills and they make the connection between school and training in the workforce,” Mr Mungioli said. 

“Some of the skills they learn and develop are responsibility, initiative, reliability, team work and communication.”

Mr Mungioli said these programs were the best start anyone could get in the workforce, from automotive training to business management training.

A previous student of the school, Courtney Ugle who recently graduated from Newton Moore now works for the South Metro Youth Link which supports young indigenous students in getting into school based traineeships.

Ms Ugle dedicated her time between school and sporting commitments and completed her two year traineeship with Worsley Alumina. 

She has recently joined South Metro Youth Link and is now a mentor for students at Newton Moore High School and provides them guidance and support to help them achieve their goals.

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