Concrete and art to fuse in new creative community project

Concrete and art collide: Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School students with Holcim regional manager Mathew Wallace. Photo: Supplied.
Concrete and art collide: Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School students with Holcim regional manager Mathew Wallace. Photo: Supplied.

Bunbury students will soon work with Indigenous artist Troy Bennell on a project to transform the external walls fronting Dodson Street in Halifax's Light Industrial Estate. 

Holcim Bunbury operations have commissioned the creative project, which will see 19 Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School students from Years 4, 5 and 6 get involved.

“Geostone colours are a ready made palette, as these are colours of the South West,” Mr Bennell said.

Students recently toured Holcim’s Bunbury quarry and concrete plants to provide them with inspiration for the to create their own artwork.

They learnt about the process of aggregate extraction and saw how the extracted basalt is used to make concrete.

Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School teacher Emma McGill said she hadn’t seen the children so excited or engaged and asking questions before.

“The information complemented learning that many of the students had undertaken on how rocks are made and what they are used to produce,” she said. 

Holcim South West manager Matthew Wallace said the project had everybody in the community excited. 

“Troy and all the children are very eager to get started and get involved and we can’t wait to see the final outcome,” he said.

“Everyone benefits from these types of projects where the community is involved and we get to see the children’s creative talents on display, along with one of Australia’s most talented artists.”

The artwork will be displayed at the Holcim Community Open Day at the Bunbury Concrete Plant on Dodson Road on Saturday, March 24 from 11am.