South West drivers urged to take care as animal collisions increase

FAWNA president Suzi Strapp with one-year-old Western Grey Kangaroo, Jethro, who was orphaned when his mother was hit by a car in Yallingup. Image Sophie Elliott.
FAWNA president Suzi Strapp with one-year-old Western Grey Kangaroo, Jethro, who was orphaned when his mother was hit by a car in Yallingup. Image Sophie Elliott.

Animal collisions in WA are set to peak as winter approaches, according to the latest data from insurance company AAMI.

The data showed a spike in animal strikes in May with South West drivers at a higher risk.

Bunbury was listed as third behind Margaret River and Baldivis recording the most number of animal collisions from the past 12 months. 

AAMI spokesperson Ashleigh Paterson said now was the time for drivers to be extra vigilant.

“As the days shorten, motorists are sharing the road with animals for longer periods of time as they are most active during dawn or dusk,” she said. 

“Wildlife is unpredictable, so we encourage drivers to always expect the unexpected on the road, particularly in signposted wildlife areas.

“Simple things like being aware of your surroundings, driving to the speed limits, and being extra vigilant at dawn and dusk can help keep you and our wildlife safe.”

FAWNA wildlife rescue president Suzi Strapp said calls for assistance tended to peak on the weekends when metropolitan drivers left the city for unfamiliar roads.

“We receive several calls a day for assistance,” she said. 

“Only last week an owl smashed a windscreen when it collided and a beautiful Wedge-tailed Eagle was left with two broken legs.”