South West boaties encouraged to check marine batteries before heading out into open waters

Battery check with Coast Guard crewman John Tingey and Battery World's Steve Minter. Image supplied.
Battery check with Coast Guard crewman John Tingey and Battery World's Steve Minter. Image supplied.

Battery World Bunbury has joined with the Australian Coast Guard, to remind boaties to make some simple checks before heading out on the water this Summer. 

Battery World Franchisee Matt Giles said there were still a lot of boaties who would cut corners to save a few dollars by using an auto battery instead of a battery especially designed for marine systems.

Coast guard commander Steven Fleming said at least once a week there was a call out for a flat battery and more often than not the boat had an auto battery and not a marine battery. 

“Experienced skippers always carry a secondary marine battery aboard, and use it to power auxiliary systems such as radios and fridges while on the water,” he said.

“This ensures the primary marine battery is kept at full power and reserved to start the motor and get you home at the end of the day.

“Some boaties are unaware of development changes in battery technology, not only that but with most boats and jet skis taken to the water via a trailer, just that extra bumping on the road can take its toll on your battery.”

Mr Giles said it was not just pride at stake but lives could be put at risk.

“You can’t get a push on the water,” he said.

“There could be little or no marine traffic where you are and the weather can change and suddenly you are in a life-threatening situation.

“Boat technology continues to become increasingly complex incorporating advanced electronics and engine management systems all placing greater demand and expectation on a battery.

“Fishers and boaties are running a lot of gadgets – charging our phone, running a fridge or playing music through a speaker all connected to the battery.”