Charles and Isobel Horner celebrate 70 years of marriage

A life well lived together: Charles and Isobel Horner said they were best friends and would be lost without one another, 70 years on. Photo: Emily Sharp.
A life well lived together: Charles and Isobel Horner said they were best friends and would be lost without one another, 70 years on. Photo: Emily Sharp.

Bunbury couple Charles and Isobel Horner recently celebrated their seventieth wedding anniversary surrounded by family and friends.

After years of Isobel asking for the pair to renew their wedding vows, Charles suprised her on their anniversary in front of family and friends and gave his beloved a platinum ring.

The pair became officially engaged on December 16, 1948, and married the following year on May 14, 1949, at St Pauls Anglican Church in Bunbury.

The couple celebrated their wedding day with 200 of their nearest and dearest at the Bedford Hall with a live band, before enjoying a honeymoon in Bridgetown for a week.

Their keys to success rests on communication and compromise and never going to bed on an argument, with the recipe proving successful for the pair that say they are still best friends.

Seventy years later the couple beam with pride for their four children, nine grandchildren and 22 great grandchildren and said they hoped to meet a great great grandchild one day too.

Isobel first set her sights on Charles when he walked into her Aunt's corner shop when she was just 11 years old and she said to herself "I'm going to marry him".

It wasn't until years later though when they were teenagers and had the same circle of friends that Charles took notice of Isobel and thought to himself "there's some value here".

"Isobel has wonderful understanding and a moral code and that counts pretty high with me," he said.

"The hardest time was the 20 years when we were rearing our children, and it was hard but from that point onward we're very comfortable, peaceful."

The couple enjoy going out everyday for a coffee and every Thursday they go into town to have lunch.

"I just love him, because he's so wonderful, he's been so good to me - I would be lost without him," Isobel said.

"He does the cooking and the washing, I do the ironing and we work together."

Before retiring Charles worked on the railways as a locomotive driver and would dig potatoes and cut hay for extra money.

The couple were instrumental in the formation of the Powerboat Club and Charles was also a founding member of the Bunbury Sea Rescue.

They've enjoyed overseas trips to New Zealand and Europe and loved to go out on the water together for some fishing.

"The key to the whole thing is having understanding, be fair - forgiveness is a big thing," Charles said.

"We don't argue and we don't shout.

"We've had a wonderful life, we've got no regrets whatsover."