Bunbury City Classic competitors make a splash

More than 500 athletes from across the globe converged on Koombana Bay at the weekend to take part in the LGM Industries Bunbury City Classic Triathlon.

The event began early on Sunday morning, February 16, with competitors taking on the swim before cycling around the Leschenault estuary, through the waterfront, up to the lighthouse and back to Koombana Bay.

Competitors from all corners of WA took part in the state Standard Distance Championship, which also served as a qualifying race for the 2020 International Triathlon Union World Championships.

Nick Thompson was the stand out for the day after completing the standard 51.5km triathlon in just 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Bunbury Triathlon Club's very own Ryan Bailie finished second, crossing the finish line in 1 hour and 54 minutes - with Fremantle participant Guy Crawford just seconds behind.

Fellow Bunbury Triathlon members James Martin, Dale Zabiela, Jarrad Bolton and Jarryd Heldt also placed in the top 20. In the sprint, Mandurah's Ronan Hays took out first place, finishing the 25km swim, cycle and run in just over one hour.

North Coast Triathlon Club Reece Margach completed the course in one hour and four minutes, followed by UWA Triathlon Club member Tommaso Puccini.

The event was an intergenerational affair for the Neaves family, with 65-year-old grandfather Trevor, 40-year-old son Geoff and seven-year-old grandson Dane all competing.

Family affair: The event was an intergenerational affair for the Neaves family, including 65-year-old grandfather Trevor, 40-year-old son Geoff and seven-year-old grandson Dane. Photo: Supplied.

Family affair: The event was an intergenerational affair for the Neaves family, including 65-year-old grandfather Trevor, 40-year-old son Geoff and seven-year-old grandson Dane. Photo: Supplied.

Trevor, who was instrumental in forming and running the Bunbury Triathlon Club back in the early 1980s, said he felt grateful to have been able to race alongside both his son and grandson.

"If you don't use it, you'll lose it," he said.

"It's unreal for a parent to be able to race with your own child and also have your grandson in there, too.

"I don't know many people that get that luxury, to be able to do something like this with their family - it's special.

"I've been in the tri scene since about 1982, right as it started down here, and the club has been going strong ever since. To see it now, it's a good feeling.

"I see race day as a test, but the training as a lifestyle choice. It's about exercising, eating well and looking after yourself."