WATCH

Rufus the Couch Kangaroo farts and refuses to get off the sofa in Boston, South Australia

We've all gone to sleep on the couch and struggled to make it to bed. This kangaroo took it to a whole new level.

Better known by his social media moniker "Rufus the Couch Kangaroo", he didn't just nap on the couch he sounded off about it, too.

The hilarious moment on the sofa was filmed by wildlife carer Kym Haywood at Pumpkin's Patch Kangaroo Sanctuary in Boston, South Australia.

Mrs Haywood said the four-year-old roo hops from his enclosure to the house everyday at 5:30pm to sit on the couch and watch television - a habit he began as a joey.

Normally, Rufus leaves the couch to sleep outside at night but last week he fell asleep and refused to get up, prompting Mrs Haywood to start filming.

A kangaroo named Rufus (pictured) refused to get off the couch to sleep outside at Pumpkin's Patch Kangaroo Sanctuary in Boston, South Australia. Picture: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

A kangaroo named Rufus (pictured) refused to get off the couch to sleep outside at Pumpkin's Patch Kangaroo Sanctuary in Boston, South Australia. Picture: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

Rufus was snuggled up on a blanket on the couch while Mrs Haywood tried to coax him outside by offering him an almond.

"Hey Rufy. Hey buddy, guess what? It's time to go to bed. Yeah, it's bedtime," Mrs Haywood said in the clip.

But the reluctant kangaroo refused to get up and ignored Mrs Haywood before he let out an audible fart.

"I beg your pardon! Rufus, did you just do a little pop-off?" Mrs Haywood said, bursting out in laughter.

After three minutes, Mrs Haywood was still not able to get the kangaroo budge, admitting it may take up to 10 minutes for the marsupial to go outside.

Rufus farted and went back to sleep in a hilarious moment filmed by wildlife carer Kym Haywood. Picture: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

Rufus farted and went back to sleep in a hilarious moment filmed by wildlife carer Kym Haywood. Picture: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

Speaking to Australian Community Media (ACM), Mrs Haywood said she had to force Rufus out because he would eventually want to go out later.

"In that video, I was knackered and told him to go to bed. I enticed him to go outside with almonds but we wasn't having it," she said.

"He huffed at me like 'Mum, really?'. He's such a character.

"I have to let him out, otherwise he'll wake up an hour later and wake me up to let him out. We have, a couple of times, let him stay overnight when it's bad weather but he never wants to stay in the whole night."

In another video, Rufus stretched out on the couch while Mrs Haywood's husband Neil tried to watch the footy. Picture: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

In another video, Rufus stretched out on the couch while Mrs Haywood's husband Neil tried to watch the footy. Picture: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

Mrs Haywood said Rufus has made a habit of sitting on the couch ever since he came into her care when he was eight months old in 2017. He was orhpaned when his mother was hit and killed by a car.

"Rufus comes in the house every evening - he does this by his own choice. He comes to back door at 5:30-ish every evening," she said.

One video showed Rufus with his face pressed up against the TV screen while another showed him stretched out on the couch next to Mrs Haywood's husband Neil as he tried to watch the footy.

Mrs Haywood confirmed the couch kangaroo "does watch TV".

"I don't know if he's watching it like we're watching but sometimes he had his face right up at the TV - something just captures his attention," she said

Rufus hopped right up to the screen to watch television in another video. Source: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

Rufus hopped right up to the screen to watch television in another video. Source: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

"He's always been very different than our other kangaroos. We call him a hum-aroo because some of his mannerisms are so human," she said.

"Occasionally, other kangaroos want to come in but Rufus has always been like that. Most of the kangaroos, once they move outside, they tend to grow out of it.

"He basically discovered the couch and that's it. From all the others, he just has his routine. We're just happy they're all not like him!"

READ MORE:

Mrs Haywood with another kangaroo names Gromit, one of 26 that live at Pumpkin's Patch Kangaroo Sanctuary. Source: Pumpkin's Patch Kangaroo Sanctuary

Mrs Haywood with another kangaroo names Gromit, one of 26 that live at Pumpkin's Patch Kangaroo Sanctuary. Source: Pumpkin's Patch Kangaroo Sanctuary

The non-for-profit charity looks after 26 kangaroos, many of them orphans, and two wombats, with Mrs Haywood carrying out most of the day-to-day operations.

Rufus the Couch Kangaroo now has a cult social media following but Mrs Haywood said it is still a struggle to fund their animal sanctuary.

"We've had a lot of media exposure over the past couple years but it doesn't really seem to translate into donations," Mrs Haywood said.

"Definitely, donations are always very well appreciated. At the moment, we're trying rally build another shelter for the kangaroos but it's difficult on a single wage."

To donate to Pumpkin's Patch Kangaroo Sanctuary, follow donation links at "Rufus the Couch Kangaroo" on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.

Rufus and Mrs Haywood's husband Neil sit on the couch and watch television together. Source: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

Rufus and Mrs Haywood's husband Neil sit on the couch and watch television together. Source: Rufus the Couch Kangaroo, Facebook

This story He's no boxing kangaroo, he's a farting kangaroo first appeared on Newcastle Herald.