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Watch the red crabs' migration across Christmas Island

Christmas Island has just seen one of its biggest red crab migration seasons in more than a decade, with an estimated 190 million crabs marching across the sands.

Red crabs make their way to the island's shoreline over December in preparation for their birthing season. The baby crabs then make their way to the seas again.

Dr Tanya Detto, the invasive species program co-ordinator at Christmas Island National Park said the past 20 years has seen populations stabilising around 40 to 50 million.

But the past year's topped that with an increase to roughly 190 million. Of those, 120 million were estimated to be juveniles ranging in length up to 4cm.

ON THE MOVE: Millions of red crabs have migrated across Christmas Island this breeding season. Picture: Parks Australia

ON THE MOVE: Millions of red crabs have migrated across Christmas Island this breeding season. Picture: Parks Australia

In December Australian Geographic reported that locals were "swimming through clouds of baby crabs".

The species had previously been affected by the local population of yellow crazy ants, which was responsible for the annual death of millions of crabs.

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Scientists from La Trobe University have been working to control and eradicate the pest ant species.

The crabs have also been known to stray into oncoming traffic, which has caused populations to dwindle over the years.

Nowadays, locals use leafblowers to help the tiny red sea-dwellers on their way to the water.

This story Record numbers of crabs inundate Christmas Island first appeared on Newcastle Herald.