Wadarndi artist Lea Taylor designs mural to be painted by youth in Dalyellup's Central Lakes Park

A mural with 'aboriginal flavour': Artist Lea Taylor with youth painters Kayla Turner, Marcisha Dennison and Katie Hall. Picture: Pip Waller
A mural with 'aboriginal flavour': Artist Lea Taylor with youth painters Kayla Turner, Marcisha Dennison and Katie Hall. Picture: Pip Waller

"The mural is showing Aboriginal people and our art in a positive light - and it's really important that people see that."

Wadarndi artist Lea Taylor

YOUTH from within the Shire of Capel have recently begun a four-week project that will see the creation of a vibrant mural that showcases Indigenous art.

As organised by the Capel Youth Collective, youth aged between 12 and 17 were given the opportunity to help paint the mural located at Central Lakes Park in Dalyellup.

As designed by Wadarndi woman and Perth-based artist Lea Taylor, the mural once completed will feature various sea life with bursts of "aboriginal flavour".

Ms Taylor will oversee youth painters at the mural for a period of four weeks.

Ms Taylor will oversee youth painters at the mural for a period of four weeks.

Ms Taylor, who has murals featured throughout the South West, said the project stemmed from her work with school aged students throughout the state.

"With my art I focus a lot on weaving and murals but also cultural education and workshops," Ms Taylor said.

"I run a painting workshop with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children called 'We Don't All Do Dots', and it's all about teaching people what areas art comes from, because Noongars do not paint dots as our traditional style.

"Kids love it because they can paint whatever they want and then at the same time learn about Aboriginal art."

The mural as of week two of the workshop.

The mural as of week two of the workshop.

Once completed, the Dalyellup mural will feature sea life such as whales and stingrays, with traditional elements of Indigenous art.

Ms Taylor said the orange line work that featured three black lines within it, represented movement and travel.

"Three moving lines means water and the three, black circles represent a camp site of gathering place," she said.

"I've also included large, blue circles all around the bottom which is a signature I use on all of my work.

Painters enjoying helping out with the mural.

Painters enjoying helping out with the mural.

"It is a reference to rocks as Noongar people in particular do not take rocks from country because of the belief that they hold spirit - so these are the rocks in place that will protect the spirit of the building.

"The project is important because it is showing Aboriginal people and our art in a positive light - and it's really important that people see that."

The mural is estimated to be completed by early March.

It will be featured as part of the 2022 Sunset Youth Festival, set to be held at Central Lakes Park, Maidment Parade, Dalyellup on April 13.