Bunbury stands up to curb motorbike road toll

A group of passionate business owners, riding instructors and police in Bunbury have banded together to try and stop the motorbike fatalities.

A group of passionate business owners, riding instructors and police in Bunbury have banded together to try and stop the motorbike fatalities.

IT is time for Bunbury to stand up and take action to stop motorcycle riders being killed on WA roads as the WA death toll threatens to tip over its worst on record. 

This was the call made by a group of passionate business owners, riding instructors and police who met last week to pull together resources and work towards change that could save lives. 

The group wants to see changes to state legislation which would mean bikers would have to be re-tested on a regular basis, as well as a local training facility where people can learn how to stay alive on the roads. 

Several members of the group have been hit by personal tragedy involving motorbikes, spurring on their determination to curb the horrific road toll. 

The climate for change is ripe with the death of a 41-year-old man after his motorcycle and a car collided near the entrance to College Grove on November 3. 

Two off-duty police officers attempted to revive the motorcyclist but he was pronounced dead shortly after.

The fatality prompted a plea from WA Police via social media, begging motorists to take care.

The Facebook post said officers had the terrible task of telling the family of the Bunbury motorcyclist he had died. 

“That’s 35 out of a total of 154 road deaths so far this year – meaning they are significantly over-represented in the road toll when compared to the total number of motorcyclists who use our roads,” the post read. 

WA’s worst motorcycle year on record is 2008, when 36 riders or passengers were killed on the state’s roads. 

Given the current average of about three deaths per month, that figure seems certain to be passed this year.

The Bunbury advocates want to host an advanced motorcycle training program in conjunction with the long-standing Youth Driver Development Program. 

Plans are also in place to table legislation at a Bunbury RoadWise committee meeting, pushing for mandatory testing of riders every seven years.  

“The training program could change the outcome for a small few, but to make sweeping changes across the board you need to change legislation,” South West Traffic officer in charge Sergeant Craig Clarke said.

The group will meet again this week to map out the local training program. 

Can you help? If you are interested in Bunbury’s drive for change, email brianh@papalia.com.au 

Have your say on this topic. Email shanelle.miller@fairfaxmedia.com.au 

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