Collie resident Lauren Jackson embarks on mission in African nation

A helping hand for girls: Lauren Jackson has been collecting reusable and sustainable sanitary products for girls in Kenya. Photo: supplied.

A helping hand for girls: Lauren Jackson has been collecting reusable and sustainable sanitary products for girls in Kenya. Photo: supplied.

One Collie resident is reaching across the globe to assist people in Kenya.

Her work, through her charity The Children of Maasai Educational Programme’s partnership with Days for Girls, will include providing reusable and sustainable sanitary products for girls. 

The Days for Girls kits include reusable sanitary products for up to three years, with the organisation raising funds for 60 kits.

Ms Jackson said the program was designed to implement immediately and benefit the community. 

“That will go towards the girls in the schools where we work at in Kenya and we’ve purchased them from Africa so it’ll support local jobs there and then i just collect them when I arrive in Nairobi,” she said. 

“One of my friends that has volunteered in Kenya before she got onto the idea which then inspired me, she did it Nairobi, but just the impact that it had was quite prominent so I looked into it a bit more and then I talked to my host parents who are part of the volunteer organisation.”

Ms Jackson will also be working on eye and ear clinics through the Lions Eye Institute to assist children with cataracts, eye sight difficulties and reading issues. 

The University of Western Australia student was awarded the International Volunteer HQ Volunteer of the Year scholarship in December 2016. 

Ms Jackson was given a contribution towards flights and a two-week volunteer placement in Kenya, returning in July to stay for three weeks. 

Ms Jackson first went to Kenya in 2015 before setting up The Children of Maasai Educational Programme to help people she stayed with. 

Her next trip will see her working in the same school she visited two years ago. 

“You can see individual children’s growth and how they are attending school more instead of rather seeing it on a grander scale through something like UNICEF,” she said.

“It’s really nice to see individual people, individual children develop and then also because the donations go such a long way it’s not a lot of money to send a child to school for an entire year, and to be able to see that impact is just tremendous.” 

This story Reaching out to Kenya first appeared on Collie Mail.