The Ripple Effect to show in Bunbury

Bunbury Suicide Support Group members Jo Robinson and Dylan Oakey are calling on people to watch the special screening of The Ripple Effect in Bunbury. Photo by Jemillah Dawson.
Bunbury Suicide Support Group members Jo Robinson and Dylan Oakey are calling on people to watch the special screening of The Ripple Effect in Bunbury. Photo by Jemillah Dawson.

A newly created group to help people grieving their loved ones after suicide are hosting a film night to raise awareness of the issue.

Bunbury Suicide Support Group was started by Dylan Oakey, after he found a need to talk to others about his grief following his son’s death.

He said when his son died by suicide last year, he felt so alone and had no idea how to deal with the pain he was feeling.

After reaching out on Bunbury’s Ask It Facebook page, slowly people started coming forward, including counsellor Jo Robinson.

They now have about 48 people on their closed Facebook page and have had face to face meetings once a fortnight since May.

Mr Oakey said grieving for someone who has died by suicide was a unique type of grief because there were so many unanswered questions and also a lot of guilt.

“You need to understand why before you can accept what has happened and that is hard,” he said.

“That’s what happened with my son, I missed the signs and had no idea.”

Ms Robinson said the group helps with healing because it takes a lot of the pressure out and people don’t have to bottle things up.

“Others who have not been through the same situation usually don’t want to hear about it, so to have a group where people feel comfortable and can talk freely helps to get rid of the stigma,” she said.

Mr Oakey said as a survivor you pick up on how no one wants to talk about it and that was why the group was good because they don’t have to worry about upsetting anyone.

He said the group also provides suicide prevention tips and keeping mentally healthy.

It was when Mr Oakey was researching the issue he came across the film The Ripple Effect and he thought it would be great for prevention and for people who have lost someone from suicide.

The film shows a man who attempted suicide but survived and takes a journey to better understand the ripple effects his attempt had on his family, friends, and the first responders who helped save him.

He’s also working to shine light on inspirational individuals, families, and organisations who are using personal pain to help others find the hope they need to heal.

“The film has great reviews and people have been saying it saved their lives,” he said.

Mr Oakey has organised the film to be shown at Grand Cinemas on August 1 but needs at least 60 tickets sold by July 20 for it go ahead.

Tickets are $23 and can be purchased by going onto the Suicide – The Ripple Effect Grand Cinemas Bunbury Facebook page.

If you or someone you know is need of crisis help, contact Lifeline on 13 11 14.