Bunbury Historical Society to honour Armistice Day at King Cottage Museum

Remembering our servicemen: The Bunbury Historical Society is getting ready to honour those involved in the Great War ahead of Armistice Day. Photo: Supplied.
Remembering our servicemen: The Bunbury Historical Society is getting ready to honour those involved in the Great War ahead of Armistice Day. Photo: Supplied.

The Bunbury Historical Society is preparing to honour those lost in battle and the ones lucky enough to return home following the Great War. 

The group will hold an Armistice Day event at the King Cottage Museum on Sunday, November 11, from 2pm.  

Featuring presentations about World War I, and memorabilia from the era, the event will examine Australia’s roles and responsibilities towards the end of the conflict. 

Bunbury Historical Society’s Adrian Egan said the event would highlight those directly involved in the war as well as those residing in Australia.

“The event will provide accounts of individual soldiers involved,” he said.  

“We’ve got some interesting little snippets of information that wouldn’t freely be available to a lot of people. 

“The stories of mate-ship are emphasised. I’ve got a beautiful account by one soldier, he was among the last of the people from the company he had served in – all of the others had either been wounded or killed.

“He has reflected on the mates he’d lost and the ones whom weren’t the same anymore.” 

The Bunbury Historical Society recently received $3,475 to celebrate the restoration of a commemorative stained glass window within the museum, set to become part of the Armistice Day events. 

A lot of people think about the futility of war and the losses, and many think about the heroism as well.

Adrian Egan, Bunbury Historical Society

“The stain glass window was taken by the Bunbury Historical Society and we have been working on its preservation,” Mr Egan said. 

“We have tracked the people who are named on it –  both those whom came back and those whom didn’t return – to exactly where they were in the period leading up to the end of the war, particularly during the last six months.” 

The Bunbury Museum and Heritage Centre will also hold an Armistice Day exhibition from November 8 to January 8, 2019, showcasing a collection of stories, photographs, and artefacts.

This year, Australians will come together to commemorate the centenary of the Armistice. 

The Armistice ended WWI following four years of conflict across the world. More than 32,000 Australian men enlisted for service in WWI. 

The death rate for WWI enlistees from the South West was 22 per cent, while the death rate for national enlistees was 14 per cent. 

“Armistice Day is a time for reflection. It was a celebration at the time for people whom were recognising that the war had ended,” Mr Egan said. 

“It was quite bewildering for many who had served because, all of a sudden, there were no more guns and no more fighting.

“A lot of people think about the futility of war and the losses, and many think about the heroism as well.” 

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